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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Security Considerations for Conducting Fieldwork In Highly Dangerous Places or on Highly Dangerous Subjects – SSRC (Vanda Felbab-Brown | June 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on June 14, 2018
 

DRUGS, SECURITY AND DEMOCRACY PROGRAM DSD WORKING PAPERS ON RESEARCH SECURITY: NO. 3

Over the last generation, activists, journalists, and researchers working in Latin America have increasingly faced the challenge of operating in areas affected by chronic police and non-state violence. Further, rising crime rates are leading a growing number of scholars to conduct research on high-risk topics, which involves gathering data on communities that experience conflict, writing and publishing on these difficult and sensitive issues, and developing and implementing programs to deal with the needs of communities affected by violence as well as the wider conflicts in which those communities are embedded. Despite these trends, the literature on safe practices for those working in high-risk environments remains thin. The DSD Working Papers on Research Security series seeks to address this deficit by examining a range of research security concerns, providing a framework to help those working in the region consider how they can enhance their own safety as well as the safety of their associates and research participants.

The DSD Program is funded by the Open Society Foundations. The program is a partnership between OSF, the SSRC, Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, and Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas in Mexico.

Felab-Brown, V. (2014) Security considerations for conducting fieldwork in highly dangerous places or on highly dangerous subjects. DSD Working Papers on Research Security. SSRC Drugs, Security and Democracy Program.
Creative Commons: http://webarchive.ssrc.org/working-papers/DSD_ResearchSecurity_03_Felbab-Brown.pdf

‘How was Your Trip?’ Self-care for Researchers Working and Writing on Violence (Kimberly Theidon | 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on June 12, 2018
 

Social Science Research Council
DRUGS, SECURITY AND DEMOCRACY PROGRAM | DSD WORKING PAPERS ON RESEARCH SECURITY: NO. 2

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
The Drugs, Security and Democracy (DSD) Program strives to create a stronger, more systematized knowledge base on drugs, security, and democracy in Latin America and the Caribbean; to build capacity—both institutional and individual—by supporting relevant research; and to encourage policy-relevant, evidence-based research that could lead to the development of alternatives to present-day drug policies. Support is provided for research across a variety of disciplines—anthropology, criminology, economics, history, international relations, journalism, legal studies, political science, public health, public policy, sociology, and other related fields—to create a network of scholars interested in developing alternative approaches to drug policy.

ABOUT THE SERIES
Over the last generation, activists, journalists, and researchers working in Latin America have increasingly faced the challenge of operating in areas affected by chronic police and non-state violence. Further, rising crime rates are leading a growing number of scholars to conduct research on high-risk topics, which involves gathering data on communities that experience conflict, writing and publishing on these difficult and sensitive issues, and developing and implementing programs to deal with the needs of communities affected by violence as well as the wider conflicts in which those communities are embedded. Despite these trends, the literature on safe practices for those working in high-risk environments remains thin. The DSD Working Papers on Research Security series seeks to address this deficit by examining a range of research security concerns, providing a framework to help those working in the region consider how they can enhance their own safety as well

Theidon, K. (2014) ‘How was Your Trip?’ Self-care for Researchers Working and Writing on Violence. Drugs Security and Democracy Program DSD Working Papers in Research Security. New York: Social Science Research Council

Colin Thomson recognised in this week’s Queen’s Birthday Honours List0

Posted by Admin in on June 11, 2018
 

AHRECS is very proud to acknowledge the achievements of one of our senior consultants, Prof. Colin Thomson. Colin was recognised in this week’s Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

Colin is held in the highest regard by colleagues across the research ethics sector in Australia for his key contributions to the development of sensible and responsive regulation and workable research ethics guidance in this country. His best-known roles have been as chair of the Australian Health Ethics Committee and as a key drafter of the 2007 National Statement on Ethics Conduct in Human Research. As a result, he has been asked to chair a wide range of university, health, Federal and State government and research agency research ethics committees. In some cases, he played a critical role as the first chair of the committee creating ways for working that modelled best practice for the research sector. In some instances, he has been invited to share his expertise internationally.

As a result, relationships between researchers, reviewers and regulators in Australia are far healthier than in most other parts of the world. Unusually in a sector where people sometimes gauge their own worth against the research achievements of others and also where we have traced the emergence of an adversarial culture, there is deep personal affection for Colin among many researchers, reviewers and regulators. He has continued to mentor new generations of researchers, reviewers and ethics managers.

Colin models a commitment to public service and acts with a generosity of spirit that encourages others to engage with ethics. He never seeks to push other people out of the way but also never shrinks from playing a leadership role when that has been necessary. He looks to learn something from every role that he takes and is happy to share this with colleagues of every level and, indeed, reflect on the limitations of his understanding.

AHRECS cannot think of a better colleague.

Qualitative Research in Dangerous Places: Becoming an ”Ethnographer” of Violence and Personal Safety (Guidance: Social Science Research Council | 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on June 10, 2018
 

Social Science Research Council | Working Papers

“Over the last generation, activists, journalists, and researchers working in Latin America have increasingly faced the challenge of operating in areas affected by chronic police and non-state violence. Further, rising crime rates are leading a growing number of scholars to conduct research on high-risk topics, which involves gathering data on communities that experience conflict, writing and publishing on these difficult and sensitive issues, and developing and implementing programs to deal with the needs of communities affected by violence as well as the wider conflicts in which those communities are embedded. Despite these trends, the literature on safe practices for those working in high-risk environments remains thin. The DSD Working Papers on Research Security series seeks to address this deficit by examining a range of research security concerns, providing a framework to help those working in the region consider how they can enhance their own safety as well as the safety of their associates and research participants.”

Goldstein, D. (2016) Qualitative Research in Dangerous Places: Becoming an ‘Ethnographer’ of Violence and Personal Safety. Brooklyn, NY: Social Science Research Council.
Publisher (Open Access): http://webarchive.ssrc.org/working-papers/DSD_ResearchSecurity_01_Goldstein.pdf

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