ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

AHRECS team news0

Posted by Admin in on June 30, 2018
 

This is just a quick update on some changes to the AHRECS team. Assoc. Prof. Karen MartinMs Susanna Gorman and Dr Ian Pieper have joined the team. Our first intern is just about to start a 90 day internship with us, which is pretty exciting. Our old friend Assoc. Prof. Martin Tolich is moving onto his next exciting project. Martin played an important role in the conception and maturation of AHRECS so we wish him well and every success for his future endeavours. AHRECS will continue to work in New Zealand led by Dr Barry Smith.

The Academy partners in €2.8 million project0

Posted by Admin in on June 28, 2018
 

The PRO-RES (PROmoting integrity in the use of RESearch results) project, coordinated by the European Science Foundation (ESF), France, aims at building a research ethics and integrity framework devised cooperatively with the full range of stakeholders. The Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS) is a partner in this €2.8 million project along with 13 other European scientific institutions aiming to build an ethics/integrity framework for all non-medical research.

AHRECS is delighted to announce that its three Senior Consultants (Mark Israel, Gary Allen and Colin Thomson) are all members of the UK Academy of Social Sciences team that is a key partner in a €2.8 million European Union project, PRO-RES. The project aims to build an ethics/integrity framework for all non-medical research.

This consortium of 14 scientific institutions from 10 countries will draw upon previous foundational work funded by the European Commission, and other national and international agencies: “…PRO-RES is to be as inclusive as possible when targeting the ‘non-medical’ sciences. The consortium partner composition is very diverse by design, ensuring that all relevant communities, to the extent possible, are represented.” says Dr. Jean-Claude Worms, Chief Executive of ESF, coordinator of PRO-RES. The project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.
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Fraud or corrupt practices by researchers can lead to serious damage to society and the physical environment. Reliable and transparent research, divorced from political ideology and undeclared vested interests, produces robust evidence that benefits social wellbeing and societal progress.
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Time to Dismiss the Stanford Prison Experiment? – Inside Higher Ed (Greg Toppo | June 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on June 24, 2018
 

The 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment has long been considered a window into the horrors ordinary people can inflict on one another, but new interviews with participants and reconsideration of archival records shed more light on the findings

The Stanford Prison Experiment is often (too often) used to justify why research ethics review arrangements exist. The use of scandal egregious ethical lapses are fundamentally flawed – because they implicitly reinforce the message that the role of review is to protect participants from dangers a reckless researcher might fail to recognise. This discussion piece suggests there is another reason not to use it: The research design might have been seriously flawed and the conclusions it reached possibly false.

Since its inception nearly 47 years ago, the Stanford Prison Experiment has become a kind of grim psychological touchstone, an object lesson in humans’ hidden ability to act sadistically — or submissively — as social conditions permit.
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Along with Yale University researcher Stanley Milgram’s 1960s experiments on human cruelty, the August 1971 experiment has captured Americans’ imaginations for nearly half a century. It is a long-standing staple of psychology and social science textbooks and has been invoked to explain horrors as wide-ranging as the Holocaust, the My Lai massacre and the Abu Ghraib prisoner-torture scandal.
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But new interviews with participants and reconsideration of archival records are shedding new light on the experiment, questioning a few of its bedrock assumptions about human behavior.

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NDA (Ireland) Ethical Guidance for Research with People with Disabilities (Guidance | 2009)0

Posted by Admin in on June 20, 2018
 

“As the field of disability research in Ireland expands, it is vital that quality in such research be ensured.

In accordance with its statutory role in relation to disability research, the National Disability Authority offers new ethical guidelines for disability research as a resource to assist the expansion of quality disability research in Ireland. The guidelines have been drawn up through consideration of best practice internationally alongside a wide process of consultation, in particular consultation with people with disabilities.

These guidelines are designed to be used by those involved in funding, conducting, or managing disability research, most especially that which involves people with disabilities as participants. They do not replace existing general ethical guidelines in social and policy research but supplement them by providing an outline of key issues from a disability perspective.”

Access the guidance

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. INTRODUCTION TO DISABILITY RESEARCH AND ETHICS 5
2. ETHICAL GUIDANCE ON RESEARCH WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 11
3. CORE VALUES FOR RESEARCH WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 17
4. GUIDANCE FOR GOOD PRACTICE IN RESEARCH WITH PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 23
5. CASE STUDIES 45
6 REFERENCES 55
APPENDIX 1 69
ENDNOTES 75

 

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