ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Six Provocations for Big Data (Papers: Boyd and Crawford 2011)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

Abstract: The era of Big Data has begun. Computer scientists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, political scientists, bio-informaticists, sociologists, and many others are clamoring for access to the massive quantities of information produced by and about people, things, and their interactions. Diverse groups argue about the potential benefits and costs of analyzing information from Twitter, Google, Verizon, 23andMe, Facebook, Wikipedia, and every space where large groups of people leave digital traces and deposit data. Significant questions emerge. Will large-scale analysis of DNA help cure diseases? Or will it usher in a new wave of medical inequality? Will data analytics help make people’s access to information more efficient and effective? Or will it be used to track protesters in the streets of major cities? Will it transform how we study human communication and culture, or narrow the palette of research options and alter what ‘research’ means? Some or all of the above?

This essay offers six provocations that we hope can spark conversations about the issues of Big Data. Given the rise of Big Data as both a phenomenon and a methodological persuasion, we believe that it is time to start critically interrogating this phenomenon, its assumptions, and its biases.

(This paper was presented at Oxford Internet Institute’s “A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society” on September 21, 2011.)

Boyd D and Crawford K (2011), Six Provocations for Big Data. A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, September 2011. Retrieved from SSRN:http://ssrn.com/abstract=1926431 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1926431 (accessed 15 March 2015)

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Inside the ‘pro-ana’ community: A covert online participant observation (Papers: Brotsky and Giles 2007)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

“A covert participant observation was conducted into the meanings of interaction in the “pro-ana” online community. Specifically, the researchers were interested in the kind of psychological support offered by such websites and by the beliefs of community members towards eating disorders and the processes of treatment and recovery.

One of the authors joined a number of pro-ana sites in the guise of a plausible persona and experienced a variety of responses from community members, some extremely hostile, others very supportive, yet without ever being exposed as an interloper. These starkly different responses challenge the notion of a broad “proana” philosophy, suggesting that the sites are best understood as local cliques offering temporary relief from offline hostility, but it is doubtful whether they can be said to possess any therapeutic value beyond the immediate online context.”

Brotsky SR and Giles D (2007) Inside the ‘pro-ana’ community: A covert online participant observation. Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention 19: 93-109
http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/uedi20?open=19&repitition=0#vol_19

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Exploring Ethical and Methodological Issues in Internet-Based Research with Adolescents (Papers: Heather Battles 2010)0

Posted by Admin in on January 9, 2016
 

Abstract: Internet-based research is a relatively new and growing field that presents a number of ethical challenges regarding privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent. In light of a study examining discussions regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on a publicly viewable Internet message board among primarily American, Australian, and Canadian female adolescents and young adults, the author discusses the methodological and ethical concerns surrounding Internet-based qualitative research with youth. The author first provides some contextual background about the study and issues surrounding the HPV vaccine. She describes her methods of data collection and analysis and provides a summary of the results. The author then explores a number of ethical issues that arise in Internet-based research and examines her own ethical decision-making as informed by existing discussions and guidelines in this area.

Keywords: Internet, methodology, ethics, online research, adolescents, HPV, vaccination

Battles HT (2010) Exploring Ethical and Methodological Issues in Internet-Based Research with Adolescents. International Journal of Qualitative Methods 9(1): 27-39. Available at: http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/IJQM/article/viewFile/5017/6480 (accessed 23 December 2013).

(Reference from the updated Booklet 37 of the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual. Perpetual licences are available for use by all researchers within an institution. Institutions have used the GUREM as the basis for producing their own research ethics manual, as a professional development resource and a teaching and learning materials for HDR candidates.)

Research Confidentiality: Researcher and Institutional Responsibilities (PAPERS – Video: T Palys)0

Posted by Admin in on January 4, 2016
 

“On October 16, 2015, Dr. Ted Palys visited Langara College to present a fascinating talk on recent developments in Canadian case law and ethical issues regarding the protection of confidentiality when it comes to research information provided by research participants. In his presentation, Dr. Palys lays out the guidelines of the Tri-Council policy and provides a better understanding of the law around the protection of research confidentiality and the professional responsibilities of researchers and institutions.

Dr. Palys is a professor in the School of Criminology and an associate member of the Department of First Nations Studies at Simon Fraser University (SFU). His most recent publication is a 2014 book co-authored with John Lowman called, “Protecting Research Confidentiality: What Happens When Law and Ethics Collide.”

The event was organized by Dr. John Russell, Chair of the Langara Research Ethics Board, in partnership with Langara’s Scholarly Activity Steering Committee. For more information about scholarly activity and applied research at Langara College, visit www.langara.ca.”

In discussing the response and judgments relating to two significant cases Dr. Palys highlights a number of important considerations for researchers and institutions. This 90 minute workshop is recommended for researchers, research ethics reviews and research office staff.

Ted Palys (2015 ) Research Confidentiality: Researcher & Institutional Responsibilities. Lecture to Langara College, October 16, 2015.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xB21-3jWMQk

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