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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

How a simple ‘thank you’ could improve clinical trials – Nature (Editorial | November 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on December 11, 2018
 

Everyone would benefit if researchers did more to make participants feel part of a study.

When researchers at the drug giant Pfizer wanted to improve their clinical trials, the people who had taken part had a clear suggestion: researchers should say thank you.

It is a simple request, but a revealing one. When a clinical trial is completed, many participants walk away empty-handed. Most never hear from the investigators or the trial’s sponsor again. Many do not learn the results of the study in which they took part. It’s not good enough — and it indicates a deeper problem.

As we discuss in a News Feature this week, clinical-trial participants and the people who care for them are increasingly seen as partners in research. They are more informed than ever about their conditions and their medical options. And they are demanding — and receiving — more of a say in how clinical trials are designed and conducted. Some of this activity has been boosted by social media, which has allowed people with medical conditions and their carers to band together, share their experiences and advocate for change.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

 

The main obstacles to better research data management and sharing are cultural. But change is in our hands – LSE Blog (Marta Teperek and Alastair Dunning | November 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on December 7, 2018
 

This blog post is a summary of Marta Teperek’s presentation at today’s Better Science through Better Data 2018 event.

By now, it’s probably difficult to find a researcher who hasn’t heard of journal requirements for sharing research data supporting publications. Or a researcher who hasn’t heard of funder requirements for data management plans. Or of institutional policies for data management and sharing. That’s a lot of requirements! Especially considering data management is just one set of guidelines researchers need to comply with (on top of doing their own competitive research, of course).

All of these requirements are in place for good reasons. Those who are familiar with the research reproducibility crisis and understand that missing data and code is one of the main reasons for it need no convincing of this. Still, complying with the various data policies is not easy; it requires time and effort from researchers. And not all researchers have the knowledge and skills to professionally manage and share their research data. Some might even wonder what exactly their research data is (or how to find it).

Read the rest of this discussion piece

Recognizing Contributions and Giving Credit – EOS Editors’ Vox (Brooks Hanson and Susan Webb | August 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on December 6, 2018
 

AGU is working with other leading publishers to implement common standards for authorship and recognize and value specific contributions across cultures.

Problematic practices

Authorship standards in scholarly publishing can vary across disciplines. For example, in many biology papers, the last author is traditionally assumed to be the one that has organized and led the research project. In contrast, in the physical sciences, including the Earth and space sciences, the last author is considered to have contributed the least, unless the list is alphabetical. Readers are simply expected to know these distinctions.

Authorship practices are also evolving as research papers become more complex, bringing together multiple techniques and data sets, interdisciplinary approaches, international teams, and ever-longer lists of co-authors. Authors are expected to navigate the conventions and expectations of different disciplines.

Authorship issues are also at the core of many of the ethical and other difficult issues that publishers see. One problem is including honorary authors (Zen, 1988, p. 202). Another is ghost authors, who are often from industry partners or services and were involved in framing interpretations but are not recognized. This hides relevant information about influence or conflict of interest from readers. Finally, legitimate authors may be omitted because of perceived mores around funding and collaboration, or for other reasons.

Read the rest of this discussion piece

Hanson, B., and S. Webb (2018), Recognizing contributions and giving credit, Eos, 99, https://doi.org/10.1029/2018EO104827. Published on 27 August 2018.

Constructive Voices: Panel discussion about institutional implementation of the National Statement (2007 updated 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on November 24, 2018
 

On 22nd of november, AHRECS hosted its second Constructive Voices panel. These panels aim to create an opportunity for open discussion about human research ethics and research integrity among researchers, policymakers, research managers, research ethics reviewers and other stakeholders.

The first panel featured:

  • Jeremy Kenner, Expert Advisor – Ethics at NHMRC
  • Wendy Rogers, Chair NSWG, Macquarie University
  • Pamela Henry, Chair ECU HREC
  • Gary Allen, Co-Chair Chapter 3.1 drafting committeer,  Senior Consultant, AHRECS

A video-recording of the discussion will be available for streaming for 90 days for free from the here. It will then be moved to the AHRECS subscribers’ area.

By becoming a subscriber (from USD1/month) you will not only gain access to a growing library of high-quality resources (two or more items are added every month), but you will also be supporting events like the Constructive Voices panel discussions. A subscription of USD15/month provides access to all the materials.

We are also happy to hear ideas for panels and speakers for 2019. We agree that there is a need for communities of practice to develop further around research ethics. We recognise that AHRECS could do more to stimulate this and we would like to find partners who would resource this.

AHRECS has been working with Australian universities and other research institutions to respond to the recent changes to the National Statement and the new Australian Code. You can find out more about the services offered by AHRECS at https://ahrecs.com/our-services.

Regards from Mark, Gary and Colin on behalf of the AHRECS team

Items left by the speakers

Mark’s welcome and intro slides

— NHMRC —

Jeremy’s presentation slides

Jeremy’s full version slides

National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007 Updated 2018)

— WENDY ROGERS —

Wendy’s presentation

— PAMELA HENRY —

Pamela’s presentation

— GARY ALLEN —

Gary’s slides

Recording of event