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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Ethical challenges inherent in the evaluation of an American Indian/Alaskan Native Circles of Care project – American Journal of Community Psychology (David A. Julian, et al | December 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on April 15, 2018
 

Abstract
This article provides first‐person accounts of ethical issues inherent in an evaluation of the Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio (NAICCO) Circles of Care project. Circles of Care is a three‐year, infrastructure development program funded through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) which is part of the federal Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The grant program is for American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) tribes and urban Indian communities and includes a strong emphasis on community engagement and community ownership. The Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio received a Circles of Care grant in the fifth cohort of the program. The first author (Project Evaluator) presents views that typically represent a western approach to evaluation, while the second author (Project Director) presents a Native perspective. Ethical issues are defined as well as the authors’ efforts to address these concerns.

Keywords
Ethical issues, Culturally responsive evaluation

Julian, D.A., Smith, T., & Hunt, A. (2017). Ethical challenges inherent in the evaluation of an American Indian/Alaskan Native Circles of Care project. American Journal of Community Psychology, 60, 336–345.
Publisher: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ajcp.12192

Do consultancies compromise academic research and ethics? A case study of Burma/Myanmar (Papers: Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung | April 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on December 24, 2017
 

ABSTRACT
This paper contributes to ongoing debates about interactions between the political science discipline and policymaking communities by analysing the role played by scholars who work as consultants for governments, non-governmental organizations, and international aid agencies in conflict-affected and post-conflict societies. It argues that although consultancies permit scholars to engage with policy communities and provide convenient access for data collection, they also present methodological constraints and can complicate and compromise research ethics due to the inherent tensions linking the two different realms with their differing norms, agendas, and goals. The findings are based on the author’s decades of field experience in Myanmar, a country which has recently received much attention from the international community, on interviews with nine PhD candidates or PhD holders who have been employed as consultants for aid agencies in Myanmar and Southeast Asia, and analysis of secondary sources on countries with similar situations.

KEYWORDS:
Consultancy, Qualitative Research Method, Myanmar/Burma, Research Ethics, Policy-making, Transitional Democracies

Thawnghmung AM. (2017). Do consultancies compromise academic research and ethics? A case study of Burma/Myanmar. Asian Journal of Political Science 25(2): 176-193.
Publisher: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02185377.2017.1307122
Research Gate: …/publication/316061682_Do_consultancies_compromise_academic_research_and_ethics…

 

Predictive Analytics in Higher Education: Five Guiding Practices for Ethical Use (Resources | March 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on March 9, 2017
 

Five Guiding Practices for Ethical Use

Contents
….Introduction
….Guiding Practice 1: Have a Vision and Plan
….Guiding Practice 2: Build a Supportive Infrastructure
….Guiding Practice 3: Work to Ensure Proper Use of Data
….Guiding Practice 4: Design Predictive Analytics Models and Algorithms that Avoid Bias
….Guiding Practice 5: Meet Institutional Goals and Improve Student Outcomes by Intervening with Care

Introduction
Colleges are under increasing pressure to retain their students. Federal and state officials are demanding that those who enter their public institutions— especially students from underrepresented groups— earn a degree. Over two dozen states disburse some state funding on how many students an institution graduates, rather than how many it enrolls. Students and families are more anxious than ever before about crossing the degree finish line, as the financial burden of paying for college has increased significantly in recent years. And retaining students is becoming more crucial to the university bottom line. As recruiting and educating students becomes increasingly expensive, colleges hope to balance the resources they use to recruit students with revenue generated when those students are retained.

Because of these pressures, institutions have begun analyzing demographic and performance data to predict whether a student will enroll at an institution, stay on track in her courses, or require support so that she does not fall behind. Using data in this way is known as predictive analytics. Analyzing past student data to predict what current and prospective students might do has helped institutions meet their annual enrollment and revenue goals with more targeted recruiting and more strategic use of institutional aid. Predictive analytics has also allowed colleges to better tailor their advising services and personalize learning in order to improve student outcomes

Manuela Ekowo and Iris Palmer (2017) Predictive Analytics in Higher Education: Five Guiding Practices for Ethical Use. New America. https://www.newamerica.org/education-policy/policy-papers/predictive-analytics-higher-education/

What We Know About Ethical Research Involving Children in Humanitarian Settings: An overview of principles, the literature and case studies (Papers: Gabrielle Berman, et al)0

Posted by Admin in on July 24, 2016
 

This working paper identifies and explores the issues that should be considered when undertaking ethical research involving children in humanitarian settings. Both the universal (i.e. relevant to all research involving children) and specific ethical issues that may arise when involving children in research in humanitarian settings are examined. This is undertaken through a review of the literature, relevant case studies, and a reflection on the ethical issues highlighted in UNICEF’s Procedure for Ethical Standards in Research, Evaluation, Data Collection and Analysis (the Ethics Procedure). The key findings of this overview highlight that many of the ethical issues that are present in other settings remain relevant and applicable in the context of humanitarian settings. These include: an institution’s capacity to appropriately and respectfully engage children in research, understanding power relations, securing informed consent and assent, ascertaining harms and benefits, maintaining privacy and confidentiality, and ensuring appropriate communication of findings.

Berman G, Hart J, O’Mathúna D, Mattellone E, Potts A, O’Kane Clare, Shusterman J and Tanner T (2016). What We Know about Ethical Research Involving Children in Humanitarian Settings: An overview of principles, the literature and case studies, Innocenti Working Papers. 2016 (18) UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, Florence
Publisher: https://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/849/

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