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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

(Australia) Unauthorised survey asked students to rate Chinese people out of seven – Sydney Morning Herald (Nick Bonyhady | September 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on October 13, 2019
 

An unauthorised survey delivered to students at the University of Sydney under the university’s official logo asked them to rate the attractiveness and intelligence of Chinese people out of seven.

It is interesting this story doesn’t mention the National Statement (2007 updated 2018), the Australian Code (2018) or research misconduct though this may be encapsulated by the reference to suspension and investigation. The reported questions raise concerns as to the merit of the work, respect, justice and the troubling spectre of the alt-right.

The survey was delivered by both paid and volunteer pollsters to students voting in student representative council elections at the university this week. It claimed to be “approved in principle by the University of Sydney’s ethics committee” and “endorsed by the political science department.”
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A University of Sydney spokeswoman said the university had “very strong concerns” about the content of the survey, which it was not aware of until contacted by the Herald on Wednesday, and how it was delivered.
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“An initial inquiry indicates ethics approval was not obtained for the study and our logo has been used without permission,” the spokeswoman said. “We are formally contacting the staff and student involved today to advise them the matter may be subject to disciplinary proceedings.”
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Read the rest of this news story

Payment of participants in research: information for researchers, HRECs and other ethics review bodies (NHMRC | September 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on October 3, 2019
 

Purpose and scope
This document is designed to provide information for researchers and reviewers of research to assist in decision-making about when payment of participants in research is ethically acceptable.

The approach taken in this document rests on the assumption that participation in research is desirable and a benefit to both the scientific community and the community at-large. This information also takes into account three core ethical principles of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (updated 2018) (National Statement): respect, beneficence and justice. Respect requires recognition that participation in research is voluntary and based on sufficient information about, and an adequate understanding of, both the proposed research and the implications of participating in it. Beneficence requires that the potential benefits of the research must justify the risks of participation. Justice requires that the benefits and burdens of research must be shared equitably and that opportunities for participation in research not be unjustly denied to those who are eligible for participation.

The payment models and options presented in this document are intended to reflect what may be reasonable and justifiable in the context of a specific research project, not what is required or expected. It remains the remit of Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) and other ethics review bodies to determine whether, for each research project, payment is ethically appropriate and, if so, whether the type/s and amount/s of payment proposed are optimal or acceptable.

The information in this document is not intended to replace or override guidance provided in the National Statement and should be understood as providing additional information to assist those designing and reviewing human research.

Contents

Purpose and scope 1

Explanation of key terms 1

Guidance statements 2

Context and explanation 3

Considerations for researchers and reviewers 5

Resources 6

Appendix 1: Examples of payment models 7

Appendix 2: Case studies 8

Access the guidance document

(China) A 10-year follow up of publishing ethics in China: what is new and what is unchanged (Papers: Katrina A. Bramstedt & Jun Xu | September 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on September 13, 2019
 

Abstract

Background
Organ donation and transplantation in China are ethically complex due to questionable informed consent and the use of prisoners as donors. Publishing works from China can be problematic. The objective of this study was to perform a 10-year follow up on Chinese journals active in donation and transplant publishing regarding the evolution of their publishing guidelines.

Methods
Eleven Chinese journals were analyzed for 7 properties: (1) ethics committee approval; (2) procedure consent; (3) publishing consent; (4) authorship criteria; (5) conflict of interest; (6) duplicate publication; and (7) data integrity. Results were compared with our 2008 study data. Additionally, open access status, impact factor, and MEDLINE-indexing were explored.

Results
Most journals heightened the ethical requirements for publishing, compared to the results of 2008. All 11 now require their published manuscripts to have data integrity. Ten of 11 require ethics committee approval and informed consent for the publication of research studies, whereas in the original study only 2 journals evidenced these requirements. Nine of 11 have criteria for authorship, require conflict of interest disclosure, and forbid duplicate publishing. None of the journals have a policy to exclude data that was obtained from unethical organ donation practices. Nine of 11 journals are MEDLINE-indexed but only 2 are open-access.

Conclusions
Most journals have improved their general ethical publishing requirements but none address unethical organ donation practices.

Keywords:
China; Informed consent; Organ donation; Publishing; Research ethics; Research integrity

Bramstedt, K. and Xu, J. (20019) (China) A 10-year follow up of publishing ethics in China: what is new and what is unchanged. Research Integrity and Peer Review 4(17) https://doi.org/10.1186/s41073-019-0077-3.
Publisher (Open Access): https://researchintegrityjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41073-019-0077-3

Enhancing ethics review of social and behavioral research: developing a review template in Ethiopia (Papers: Liya Wassie, et al | August 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on September 1, 2019
 

Abstract

Background:
Africa is increasingly becoming an important region for health research, mainly due to its heavy burden of disease, socioeconomic challenges, and inadequate health facilities. Regulatory capacities, in terms of ethical review processes, are also generally weak. The ethical assessment of social and behavioral research is relatively neglected compared to the review of biomedical and clinical studies, which led us to develop an ethics review assessment tool for use in the review of social and behavioral research in Ethiopia, which could potentially be of value in low- and middle-income settings.

Methods:
Initially, we did a comprehensive literature review on principles, guidelines, and practices of research ethics, on social and behavioral studies, from which we extracted query terms to explore the opinions of selected key informants and focus groups in Ethiopia. The discussants and informants were selected using a convenience sampling method to evaluate an ethics review template, which integrated issues that commonly arise in social and behavioral studies. Finally, we directly solicited opinions from the discussants about the desirability, feasibility, acceptability, and relevance of the ethics review assessment tool and used the resulting data to refine our initial draft.

Results and conclusion:
Although the same basic ethics principles govern all research studies, social and behavioral research have some disciplinary particularities that may require reviewers to exercise a different orientation of ethical attention in some cases. Using a qualitative approach, we developed a review assessment tool that could potentially be useful to raise awareness, focus attention, and strengthen the review of social and behavioral studies by ethics review committees, particularly in settings without a long-standing tradition of reviewing such research. This process also exposed some areas where further capacity building and discussion of ethical issues may be necessary among stakeholders in the review of social and behavioral research.

Keywords
Behavioral, social, qualitative, biomedical research, ethics review, low and middle income

Liya Wassie, Senkenesh Gebre-Mariam, Geremew Terekegne et al. (2019) Enhancing ethics review of social and behavioural research: Developing a review template in Ethiopia. Research Ethics 15(4) 1–23.
Publisher (Open Access): https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1747016119865731

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