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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965–2009 (BOOKS: Zachary Schrag 2010)0

Posted by Admin in on May 22, 2015
 

BOOK:

“University researchers in the United States seeking to observe, survey, or interview people are required first to complete ethical training courses and to submit their proposals to an institutional review board (IRB). Under current rules, IRBs have the power to deny funding, degrees, or promotion if their recommended modifications to scholars’ proposals are not followed. This volume explains how this system of regulation arose and discusses its chilling effects on research in the social sciences and humanities.

Zachary M. Schrag draws on original research and interviews with the key shapers of the institutional review board regime to raise important points about the effect of the IRB process on scholarship. He explores the origins and the application of these regulations and analyzes how the rules—initially crafted to protect the health and privacy of the human subjects of medical experiments—can limit even casual scholarly interactions such as a humanist interviewing a poet about his or her writing. In assessing the issue, Schrag argues that biomedical researchers and bioethicists repeatedly excluded social scientists from rule making and ignored the existing ethical traditions in nonmedical fields. Ultimately, he contends, IRBs not only threaten to polarize medical and social scientists, they also create an atmosphere wherein certain types of academics can impede and even silence others.

The first work to document the troubled emergence of today’s system of regulating scholarly research, Ethical Imperialism illuminates the problems caused by simple, universal rule making in academic and professional research. This short, smart analysis will engage scholars across academia.”

The Handbook of Social Research Ethics (Books: Donna Mertens & Pauline E. Ginsberg 2008)0

Posted by Admin in on May 22, 2015
 

BOOK: Mertens DM and Ginsberg PE (eds) (2009) Handbook of Social Research Ethics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

The Handbook of Social Research Ethics is the first comprehensive volume of its kind to offer a deeper understanding of the history, theory, philosophy, andáimplementation of applied social research ethics. Much of the literature surrounding research ethics originates from or focuses on medical or related health science issues involving human subject research. Yet, the intricacies of social research often raises ethical concerns and issues that are unique to or requiring further contextualization to general research ethics topics, guidelines, and practices. This volume brings together eminent, international scholars across the social and behavioral sciences and education to address those ethical issues that arise in the theory and practice of research within the technologically advancing and culturally complex world in which we live. In addition, ethical dilemmas that arise in the relationship between research practice and social justice issues are examined. The guiding themes used throughout the volume include: Defining and exploring the role(s) of ethics in research from a multi-disciplinary perspective; Making explicit the differing ethical emphases entailed by differing research traditions; Locating ethical concerns within research practice; Elucidating how each of the above influences the relationship between good ethical practice and good research practice. This reference is an invaluable resource to graduate students, professors, researchers, and practitioners of various kinds of social and behavioral research.”

Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture0

Posted by Admin in on May 20, 2015
 

ACBC “is an independent, autonomous Centre committed to research into important bioethical issues affecting the whole community – locally, nationally and internationally. The Centre was established in 2012 in the South Australian capital, Adelaide, and now hosts the resources of the Southern Cross Bioethics Institute, which closed in 2012.

The Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture adheres to universal human values, human rights, and the laws of humanity, including the inviolable and inalienable right to life of every member of the human family, whatever the age, status or ability of that member, from conception to natural death.

Since bioethics addresses all kinds of issues faced by society in general, and particularly the very fundamental issues of human life and procreation which have at stake fundamental human rights, dignity and freedom, the Centre represents an effective contribution to the making of public policy in a non-party-political fashion.

The staff of the Centre are involved in continuous bioethical research, writing, and professional consultation on various subjects like reproductive technology, ethical issues in care of the aged, abortion, euthanasia, biotechnology, embryo experimentation, organ donation, resource allocation and many others.

The Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture is a community resource. We have educational services for individuals, students, institutions, community groups and politicians of all political persuasions. The Centre provides expert comments and submissions to governments, research committees and international forums”.

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