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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Steven Lubet’s review of ON THE RUN: Fugitive Life in an American City (Fieldwork Encounters and Discoveries), by Alice Goffman0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

“Alice Goffman’s widely acclaimed On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City has drawn more positive attention than almost any sociology book in recent years. The success of the book led to a lecture tour of at least twenty sociology departments and conferences. Her TED talk, which was often interrupted by applause, has had nearly 700,000 views. A careful reading of On the Run, however, leaves me with vexing questions about the author’s accuracy and reliability. There are just too many incidents that strike me as unlikely to have occurred as she describes them. One must try to keep an open mind about such things – especially regarding someone as obviously brilliant and dedicated as Goffman – so readers may disagree with me about the extent of her embellishments. In any event, there is a bigger problem. As I will explain below, Goffman appears to have participated in a serious felony in the course of her field work – a circumstance that seems to have escaped the notice of her teachers, her mentors, her publishers, her admirers, and even her critics.”

Review by Steven Lubet

Values and Ethics – Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

The Values and Ethics Guidelines is an Australian national guideline for health research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and issues. The document was intended to be a reference for researchers and ethics reviewers. The document was issued by the NHMRC. The Values and Ethics Guidelines introduces and discusses the following principles:

  • Reciprocity
  • Respect
  • Equality
  • Responsibility
  • Survival and protection
  • Spirit and integrity

Even though the document has not been enacted adherence to the Values and Ethics Guidelines is at least notionally a condition of NHMRC funding. The annual human research ethics compliance report sent to institutions by the NHMRC queries whether the Values and Ethics Guidelines were utilised. It is expected that the outcome of a review of the document will be released later in 2015.

Keeping research on track: a guide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples about health research ethics0

Posted by Admin in on May 28, 2015
 

The Keeping research on track document is resource produced for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and peoples about human research. It is a useful document to make accessible to potential participants and for researchers to consider when initially designing a research project. Like the Values and Ethics Guidelines (see here) it has been drafted for health research and while (for the most part) the ideas are transferable to other areas of human research it is unlikely to be helpful for humanities or creative/fine arts research.

Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies (GERAIS)0

Posted by Admin in on May 27, 2015
 

Published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. This resource was first published in 2002 and was updated in 2010 and 2012. The guidelines outline 15 principles which should inform the conception, design, conduct and reporting the results of research Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Arguably the principles discussed in the GERAIS document are a far more useful reference for research outside of the health sciences compared to the NHMRC’s Values and Ethics guidelines.

“Indigenous peoples have inherent rights, including the right to self-determination. The principles in these Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies are founded on respect for these rights, including rights to full and fair participation in any processes, projects and activities that impact on them, and the right to control and maintain their culture and heritage. AIATSIS considers that these principles are not only a matter of ethical research practice but of human rights.

“It is essential that Indigenous people are full participants in research projects that concern them, share an understanding of the aims and methods of the research, and share the results of this work. At every stage, research with and about Indigenous peoples must be founded on a process of meaningful engagement and reciprocity between the researcher and Indigenous people. It should also be recognised that there is no sharp distinction between researchers and Indigenous people. Indigenous people are also researchers, and all participants must be regarded as equal partners in a research engagement.”

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