ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Chronic Poverty Research Centre Methods Toolbox (Resources)0

Posted by Admin in on June 16, 2016
 

“Despite the growing consensus that poverty is multi-dimensional and complex, a lot of research is based on using approaches and methods that cannot capture a full picture. To deepen the understanding of poverty, much research needs to be multi-disciplinary and involve a mix of quantitative, qualitative and participatory approaches.

This toolbox provides a guide to the variety of approaches and methods available and how they can be mixed to produce both rigorous and policy relevant research. Through identifying further resources (and especially websites) where you can explore methodological tools and issues in greater detail, the toolbox allows researchers to check that their research designs reflect ‘good practice’.

The CPRC Methods toolbox is available to download in full, or by sections below. The document contains links that can be accessed by viewing the Toolbox online.”

Chronic Poverty Research Centre (2001) Chronic Poverty Research Centre Methods Toolbox.
http://www.chronicpoverty.org/page/toolbox

Australian Council for International Development (ACFID) (2016) Principles and Guidelines for ethical research and evaluation in development0

Posted by Admin in on June 15, 2016
 

“This document is intended to promote and support improved development practice in the areas of research and evaluation, to raise awareness, and to assist in the identification of ethical issues so that well-considered decisions can be made and justified. Ethical principles are considered most important as ethical practice in research and evaluation relies on active self-reflection, discretion, judgement and appreciation of context.

“This document was prepared by Australian Council for International Development (ACFID), in consultation with its member organisations, academic partners and the ACFID University Network. It was developed to assist ACFID members and is aligned with the ACFID Code of Conduct. In particular, the principles proposed here have been developed in line with the values that underpin the work of ACFID members in aid and development represented in this Code of Conduct.

“The principles outlined here are based on and extend existing internationally recognised ethical research
principles and guidance for data collection with human participants. The extensions include an emphasis on cross-cultural elements, power relations, capacity building and understanding the ‘development’ imperative within research practice conducted with and through non-governmental organisations.

“While this document only presents principles, ACFID acknowledges the existing body of experience and
guidance around how these principles may be operationalized. Such guidance to assist with this understanding will be elaborated and offered through ongoing updates under the ACFID Code of Conduct Implementation Guidance. The guidance will incorporate the principles outlined here while offering advice on obtaining informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, assessing, minimising and managing risks as well as guidance on how to support ethical research practice with particular vulnerable groups including children, people living with a disability etc. This guidance is expected to be updated on an annual basis through consultation with ACFID members”

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Overview on health research ethics in Egypt and North Africa (Papers: Diaa Marzouk 2014)0

Posted by Admin in on May 27, 2016
 

Abstract: Developing countries, including Egypt and North African countries, need to improve their quality of research by enhancing international cooperation and exchanges of scientific information, as well as competing for obtaining international funds to support research activities. Research must comply with laws and other requirements for research that involves human subjects. The purpose of this article is to overview the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, with reference to other Middle Eastern countries. The EU and North African Migrants: Health and Health Systems project (EUNAM) has supported the revision of the status of health research ethics in Egypt and North African countries, by holding meetings and discussions to collect information about research ethics committees in Egypt, and revising the structure and guidelines of the committees, as well as reviewing the literature concerning ethics activities in the concerned countries. This overview has revealed that noticeable efforts have been made to regulate research ethics in certain countries in the Middle East. This can be seen in the new regulations, which contain the majority of protections mentioned in the international guidelines related to research ethics. For most of the internationally registered research ethics committees in North African countries, the composition and functionality reflect the international guidelines. There is growing awareness of research ethics in these countries, which extends to teaching efforts to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students.

Marzouk D, Abd El Aa W, Saleh A, Sleem H, Khyatti M, Mazini L, Hemminki K, Anwar WA (2014) Overview on health research ethics in Egypt and North Africa. European Journal of Public Health. Vol. 24, Supplement 1, 87–91. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cku110.
Publisher (Open Access): http://eurpub.oxfordjournals.org/content/24/suppl_1/87.long

National Centre for Indigenous Genomics0

Posted by Admin in on May 24, 2016
 

We were blown away by this resource and this fantastic video. It is a wonderful example of how to explain the essence of complex research. The depth and skill of cultural communication is worthy of praise, recognition and is worth emulating.

“The National Centre for Indigenous Genomics (NCIG) aims to create a repository of Indigenous biospecimens, genomic data and documents for research and other uses that benefit Indigenous donors, their communities and descendants, the broader Indigenous community and the general Australian community.
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“About NCIG: an introduction for donor communities – This is the first of several animations NCIG is developing to assist consultation and engagement between the Centre and donor communities. This introductory film explains the origins of the NCIG collection, and its potential in the context of modern scientific and medical research.
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“This animation was collaboratively developed by representatives of NCIG’s Research Advisory Committee, with valuable input from the team at the Machado Joseph Disease Foundation and Browndog Productions. It was funded by The Canberra Medical Society.”

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