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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Research, Ethics and Indigenous Peoples: An Australian Indigenous perspective on three threshold considerations for respectful engagement (Ambelin Kwaymullina | 2016)0

Posted by Admin in on July 10, 2018
 

Abstract

This paper discusses valuable threshold questions for researchers considering conducting research with First Peoples – matters that need to have been addressed FAR IN ADVANCE of research ethics review. While the paper is focussed upon research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples its questions hold true for research for most First Peoples. We have included links to a treasure trove of discussions on this important area.

Indigenous peoples have long critiqued the harmful effects of Eurocentric research processes upon Indigenous cultures and communities. This paper—which is grounded in the author’s knowledge and experience as an Aboriginal Australian academic—examines three threshold considerations relevant to non-Indigenous scholars who seek to enter into respectful research relationships with Indigenous peoples or knowledges. The first is the question of whether the research should be conducted at all. The second is positionality and how this affects research. The third is the need for scholars to comprehensively inform themselves about ethical research principles, including in relation to free, prior and informed consent, and Indigenous cultural and intellectual property.
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Keywords research, colonialism, sovereignty, free, prior and informed consent, ethics, Indigenous peoples
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Kwaymullina, A. (2016). “Research, Ethics and Indigenous Peoples: An Australian Indigenous perspective on three threshold considerations for respectful engagement.” AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples 12(4): 437-449.
Publisher: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.20507/AlterNative.2016.12.4.8#articleCitationDownloadContainer

Research ethics committees in the Pacific Islands: gaps and opportunities for health sector strengthening (Papers: Justin T Denholm, et al | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 8, 2018
 

Abstract
There has been a range of developments in recent years to stimulate increasing public health research activity throughout the Pacific. Development of local capacity for ethics committee review and oversight is, however, frequently underdeveloped. This is reflected in the number of Pacific Island nations where ethics committees have not been established or where only informal processes exist for ethics review and oversight. This is problematic for the optimal development of relevant and culturally appropriate research, and building up local ethics committees should be part of continued research development in the Pacific. Three areas in which local ethics committees may add value are 1) offering better capacity to reflect local priorities, 2) providing broader benefits for research capacity building, and 3) assisting to strengthen systems beyond research ethics. This article considers benefits and challenges for ethics committees in the Pacific, and suggests directions for regional development to further strengthen public health research activity.

Keywords: research ethics, Pacific Islands, operational research, public health, ethics

J. T. Denholm, K. Bissell, K. Viney, A. M. Durand, H. L. Cash, C. Roseveare, O. E. Merilles, Jr., A. D. Harries and S. Biribo (2017) Research ethics committees in the Pacific Islands: gaps and opportunities for health sector strengthening. Public Health Action. 2017 Mar 21; 7(1): 6–9. Published online 2017 Mar 21. doi: 10.5588/pha.16.0076 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5526493/

Open access

Europe’s biggest research fund cracks down on ‘ethics dumping’ – Nature (Linda Nordling | July 2018)0

Posted by Admin in on July 7, 2018
 

The practice of conducting ethically dubious research in foreign countries is under fresh scrutiny.

Ethics dumping — doing research deemed unethical in a scientist’s home country in a foreign setting with laxer ethical rules — will be rooted out in research funded by the European Union, officials announced last week.

A commendable move by the EU, which at least, in theory, is addressed by the provisions of national research ethics frameworks such as Australia’s National Statement, but peak research funding bodies should consider the merits a similarly clear statement in its funding criteria.

Applications to the EU’s €80-billion (US$93-billion) Horizon 2020 research fund will face fresh levels of scrutiny to make sure that research practices deemed unethical in Europe are not exported to other parts of the world. Wolfgang Burtscher, the European Commission’s deputy director-general for research, made the announcement at the European Parliament in Brussels on 29 June.
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Burtscher said that a new code of conduct developed to curb ethics dumping will soon be applied to all EU-funded research projects. That means applicants will be referred to the code when they submit their proposals, and ethics committees will use the document when considering grant applications.
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Read the rest of this discussion piece

(Philippines) National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health-Related Research (PHREB | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 5, 2018
 

Prepared by the Philippine Health Research Ethics Board Ad Hoc Committee for Updating the National Ethical Guidelines

R E S O L U T I O N “RECOGNIZING DR. MARITA V.T. REYES AND THE MEMBERS OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE FOR THEIR EFFORTS ON THE REVISION OF THE NATIONAL ETHICAL GUIDELINES”

WHEREAS, the Ad Hoc Committee for the Updating of the National Ethical Guidelines was created to update the existing ethical guidelines to ensure adherence to local, national, and international principles and values and respect for Filipino morals and culture;

WHEREAS, the Ad Hoc Committee for the Updating of the National Ethical Guidelines was created on 13 January 2015, with Dr. Marita V.T. Reyes as Chair and the following as members: Dr. Rosario Angeles T. Alora, Dr. Leonardo D. de Castro, Prof. Edlyn B. Jimenez, Dr. Ricardo M. Manalastas, Jr., Dr. Evangeline O. Santos, and Dr. Cecilia V. Tomas;

WHEREAS the Ad Hoc Committee has completed its draft and the Philippine Health Research Ethics Board (PHREB) has approved the National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health-Related Research 2017 (NEGHHR 2017);

Access the Filippino health research guidelines

Philippine Health Research Ethics Board (2017) National Ethical Guidelines for Health and Health Related Research. Manila: Department of Science and Technology – Philippine Council for Health Research and Development. http://www.ethics.healthresearch.ph/index.php/phoca-downloads/category/4-neg

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