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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Research Ethics Timeline (1932-Present)0

Posted by Admin in on March 26, 2017
 

Comprehensive (albeit with a US focus) human research ethics timeline from Tuskegee (1932-72) to the Final Rule for revisions to the Common Rule (2017).

Resnik, D.B. (2017): Research Ethics Timeline (1932-Present). National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
https://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/resources/bioethics/timeline/index.cfm

President of Taiwan university to step down amidst investigation – Retraction Watch (Victoria Stern | March 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on March 25, 2017
 

The president of a top university in Taiwan has announced he will resign from his post at the end of his first term in June.

President Pan-chyr Yang of National Taiwan University (NTU) has opted not to seek a second term as president given two recent investigations — one which concluded last month and one which is ongoing — into allegations of misconduct in papers he co-authored.

Despite being cleared of misconduct in the investigation conducted by his university, Yang felt that the scandal had left a stain on NTU’s reputation, which he hoped to restore by stepping down as president. Here’s more from Focus Taiwan:

Read the rest of this news story

Everything You Need to Know About Conflicts of Interest (Part II) – Psychology Today (Sara Gorman and Jack M. Gorman | February 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on March 20, 2017
 

It’s not just about the money.

As we discussed in Part I of this three-part series on conflicts of interest, it’s not exactly a surprise that money can be a powerful influence on scientists’ and physicians’ behavior. Scientists and physicians who take money from drug companies are prone to design studies in ways that favor the company’s products[1], to minimize adverse side effects the company’s medications cause, and to prescribe the company’s medications to their patients.[2] Organizations that formulate guidelines for the treatment of various illnesses often have financial relationships with companies that make products recommended in the guidelines.[3]

These facts have led to many policies that attempt to make financial relationships between the pharmaceutical industry and the biomedical world more transparent. Journals require disclosure statements by authors of potential conflicts of interest and laws like the federal Physicians Payment Sunshine Act of 2010 mandate that payments by medical product manufacturers to physicians and teaching hospitals be reported to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) and made public on a website.

Other forms of financial incentives to scientists also frequently make the news. Recently, for example, the media revealed that scientists who concluded that fat rather than sugar is the most harmful part of our diet received money to support their research from the sugar industry. Similar alarms have been raised about the relationships between agricultural scientists who study the effects of pesticides and the safety of GMOs and the companies that make those products.

Read the rest of this discussion piece
Go to Part I of this series
This is Part II of this series
Go to Part III of this series*

* Part III doesn’t really discuss Conflicts of interest in research of any CoI so though we link to it here we’ve not included Part III in the Resource Library

Everything You Need to Know About Conflicts of Interest (Part I) – Psychology Today (Sara Gorman & Jack M. Gorman | January 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on March 18, 2017
 

Is transparency the only solution?

In September of 2016, a shocking expose in The New York Times revealed that everything we thought we knew about sugar, fat, and heart disease was wrong. And not only was it wrong, but the information we had been using to guide our decisions about what to eat and what to feed our kids had been manipulated in what can only be described as a conspiracy between scientists and the sugar industry.

Needless to say, people were outraged. As one reader of The New York Times article commented, “This was a conspiracy of scientific FRAUD. The sugar companies that did this should be sued for $BILLIONS for the health harm that they caused.” It wasn’t long before comparisons to the tobacco industry started: “Sugar is the new tobacco and has been for a while. The article is just the tip of the iceberg,” commented another NYT reader.

And then, in the midst of election season, came the conspiracy theories: “FYI.. Hillary very well funded by Big Sugar so you can bet nothing will happen as a result of these findings. With Hillary in the White House, we’ll all be eating cake anyway- It’s a win win for everyone!”

Read the rest of this discussion piece
This is Part I of this series
Go to Part II of this series
Go to Part III of this series*

* Part III doesn’t really discuss Conflicts of interest in research of any CoI so though we link to it here we’ve not included Part III in the Resource Library

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