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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Covert Research The Art, Politics and Ethics of Undercover Fieldwork (Books: David Calvey | 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 23, 2017
 

Undercover research is an emotive and controversial field often equated with deception and transgression. Using classic examples and contemporary case studies this book challenges covert research’s dispersed place within the social sciences and rehabilitates its reputation as a powerful research method.

Drawing in part on his own undercover research into the night-time economy of bouncers, the author explores the roots and evolution of covert research; his deft treatment of the fear and fascination within furtive fieldwork is grounded in the practicality of the methods and tools needed to conduct quality research in the field.

Packed with learning-by-example tips, this book shows that with critical imagination and proper ethical foundations, covert research could be a great addition to your methodological toolkit.

Calvey, D. (2017). Covert Research: The Art, Politics and Ethics of Undercover Fieldwork, SAGE Publications.
Publisher: https://au.sagepub.com/en-gb/oce/covert-research/book234298

Scholars Cry Foul at Their Inclusion on List of Academics Paid by Google – The Chronicle of Higher Education (Chris Quintana | July 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 21, 2017
 

This week an advocacy group published what it called a list of scholars who have received money from Google and who have written papers that supported its interests, sometimes without disclosing that apparent conflict of interest. Sarah T. Roberts said she doesn’t understand why she was on the list.

Sure, she told The Chronicle, she was a Google fellow in 2009, but that meant a $7,000 award to cover her expenses during a 10-week stint working in Washington, D.C., for the American Library Association.

Why that 2009 fellowship would be relevant to a 2015 paper on information privacy — in which Ms. Roberts, an assistant professor of information studies at the University of California at Los Angeles, was listed as the fourth author — is not clear to her. More important, she said, she didn’t receive any money from the technology giant in connection to that paper. And if the advocacy group’s concern was that she had benefited from Google in the past, that information is on her curriculum vitae.

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(Australia) Are there foxes in Tasmania? Follow the poop – Retraction Watch (Victoria Stern | July 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 15, 2017
 

Stephen Sarre, based at the University of Canberra in Australia, has made a career out of collecting and analyzing poop.

We don’t generally add items to the news room relating to animal research but the issues of contaminated samples, hoaxing and false positives run across research integrity and go well beyond animal research.

It’s a tough job, but someone’s got to do it. Part of his work is designed to answer a multi-million dollar question: Is Tasmania home to foxes, a pest that carries rabies and other diseases and can ravage local wildlife? According to the Australian news outlet ABCthe Tasmanian and Australian governments have spent $50 million (AUD) on hunting foxes on the island since 2001 — even though many have debated whether they are even there.
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In 2012, after analyzing thousands of fecal samples, Sarre published a paper in the Journal of Applied Ecology which boldly claimed that “Foxes are now widespread in Tasmania.” But many outside researchers didn’t buy it, and quickly voiced their criticisms of the paper, namely that there may be problems with false positives and the methodology used to analyze the samples. Recently, the journal issued an expression of concern for the paper, citing an ongoing investigation into the allegations.
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Lost in translation: Authors blame a language error for wrong diagnosis – Retraction Watch (Alison McCook | July 2017)0

Posted by Admin in on July 11, 2017
 

A patient’s “unusual” brain cyst excited several researchers in China so much they published a paper about it in a major journal. Soon a reader identified a glaring mistake: the authors had described the cause of the cyst incorrectly.

A month after the paper appeared online in November 2016, the reader — a neurologist — published a letter in the journal, pointing out the incorrect diagnosis. In their response, the authors acknowledged the mistake but said it had occurred not because they had misdiagnosed the patient, but because the diagnosis had been mistranslated from Chinese to English.

The editors of Neurology retracted the paper because of the error and published a new version with the correct diagnosis on the same day, June 6.

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