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Planning Ethically Responsible Research (Books: Joan Sieber & Martin Tolich 2012)0

Posted by Admin in on May 22, 2015
 

BOOK: Sieber JE and Tolich MB (2013) Planning Ethically Responsible Research (2nd edition). Los Angeles: Sage.

“Extensively revised and updated to serve today’s needs for insight and solutions to the most vexing ethical and regulatory problems faced by researchers today, Planning Ethically Responsible Research, Second Edition guides readers through one of the most important aspects of their social or behavioral research: planning ethically responsible research. Authors Joan E. Sieber and Martin B. Tolich offer invaluable, practical guidance to researchers and graduate students to understand ethical concerns within real-life research situations, satisfy federal regulations governing human research, and work with the university’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). The book includes an abundance of useful tools: detailed instructions on development of an effective IRB protocol; methods for handling issues of consent, privacy, confidentiality and deception; ways to assess risk and benefit to optimize research outcomes; and how to respect the needs of vulnerable research populations.”

Ethics in Qualitative Research (Books: Martyn Hammersley & Anna Traianou 2012)0

Posted by Admin in on May 22, 2015
 

BOOK: Hammersley M and Traianou A (2012) Ethics in Qualitative Research: Controversies and Contexts. London: Sage.

“All social researchers need to think about ethical issues. Their salience has recently been increased by the pressures of ethical regulation, particularly in the case of qualitative research. But what are ethical issues? And how should they be approached? These are not matters about which there is agreement. Ethics in Qualitative Research explores conflicting philosophical assumptions, the diverse social contexts in which ethical problems arise, and the complexities of handling them in practice.

The authors argue that the starting point for any discussion of research ethics must be the values intrinsic to research, above all the commitment to knowledge-production. However, the pursuit of inquiry is rightly constrained by external values, and the book focuses on three of these: minimising harm, respecting autonomy, and protecting privacy. These external values are shown to be far from unequivocal in character, often in conflict with one another (or with the commitments of research), and always subject to situational interpretation and practical judgment. Nevertheless, it is contended that in the present challenging times it is essential that qualitative researchers uphold research values.

is Professor of Educational and Social Research at The Open University.

is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London.”

Dartmouth and Stanford Apologize After a Political-Science Experiment Gone Wrong – The Chronicle of Higher Education0

Posted by Admin in on May 22, 2015
 

A political-science study that involved a deceptive mailing to Montana voters raises questions about a new research trend.

Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture0

Posted by Admin in on May 20, 2015
 

ACBC “is an independent, autonomous Centre committed to research into important bioethical issues affecting the whole community – locally, nationally and internationally. The Centre was established in 2012 in the South Australian capital, Adelaide, and now hosts the resources of the Southern Cross Bioethics Institute, which closed in 2012.

The Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture adheres to universal human values, human rights, and the laws of humanity, including the inviolable and inalienable right to life of every member of the human family, whatever the age, status or ability of that member, from conception to natural death.

Since bioethics addresses all kinds of issues faced by society in general, and particularly the very fundamental issues of human life and procreation which have at stake fundamental human rights, dignity and freedom, the Centre represents an effective contribution to the making of public policy in a non-party-political fashion.

The staff of the Centre are involved in continuous bioethical research, writing, and professional consultation on various subjects like reproductive technology, ethical issues in care of the aged, abortion, euthanasia, biotechnology, embryo experimentation, organ donation, resource allocation and many others.

The Adelaide Centre for Bioethics and Culture is a community resource. We have educational services for individuals, students, institutions, community groups and politicians of all political persuasions. The Centre provides expert comments and submissions to governments, research committees and international forums”.

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