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(Australian case) A publisher just retracted 22 articles. And the whistleblower is just getting started – Retraction Watch (Ivan Oransky | September 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on September 15, 2019
 

SAGE Publishing is today retracting 22 articles by a materials science researcher who published in two of their journals — but the anonymous reader who brought the problems to their attention says the author’s duplication affects more than 100 articles.

This very recent Australian case could be a useful example to point to when talking about repeat publication.

Ali Nazari, now of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, had five papers retracted earlier this year from an Elsevier journal. His total of now 27 retractions — the others from the International Journal of Damage Mechanics and the Journal of Composite Mechanics — came following emails in January of this year from an anonymous reader to several publishers raising concerns that Nazari had duplicated his work in more than 100 articles.
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Here’s the retraction notice for the 22 articles retracted by SAGE:
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In 2019 SAGE became aware of author misconduct concerning suspected redundant publication of 22 articles published in International Journal of Damage Mechanics and Journal of Composite Materials. SAGE and the journals’ Editors immediately launched an investigation and found that the following articles contain significant overlap with previously published articles by at least one of the authors listed on each of the articles below. Therefore, SAGE and the journals’ Editors have decided to retract the following articles for reasons of redundant publication.
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Q&A Linda Beaumont: Journals should take action against toxic peer reviews – Nature Index (Gemma Conroy | August 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on September 8, 2019
 

Keep it constructive.

Learning to accept criticism is an important skill for researchers navigating the peer-review process. But what happens when the feedback is unhelpful, rude or downright toxic?

Linda Beaumont, an ecologist at Macquarie University in Australia, is no stranger to a harsh review.

“One reviewer of a submission bluntly wrote, ‘I can’t believe the authors used this approach. This paper shouldn’t be published,’” says Beaumont. “Two sentences. I was gobsmacked.”

But when one of her PhD students received a similarly cutting review, Beaumont knew it was time to speak out.

In August 2019, she published a comment in Nature calling for clear ethical guidelines for peer-reviewers. She adds that editors have a role to play in addressing damaging feedback before it reaches the authors.

Nature Index spoke to Beaumont about how peer reviewers can keep their feedback constructive, and how authors should respond when they don’t.

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Expression of Interest: Consumer Inclusive Research – Consumer Reference Group0

Posted by Admin in on August 26, 2019
 

The Hopkins Centre is recruiting 8 consumer representatives on a Consumer Inclusive Research – Consumer Reference Group.

The Hopkins Centre is conducting research on “Supporting the ethical inclusion of people with acquired disability in research: Consumer informed approaches”. We invite consumers and community members to join a reference group which will support and guide us in this project. We cannot and should not do our research without including you, so we are asking for your help.

This opportunity would suit a consumer who has a particular interest in research.

Membership
We are recruiting 8 consumers or carers from a variety of backgrounds to participate in a maximum of 4 meetings to be held over approximately 6 months via teleconference or web based.

Applications from a range of people and groups is encouraged.

How to apply
Please complete the Expression of Interest form below and return to Dr Gary Allen at The Hopkins Centre via g.allen@griffith.edu.au by 9am Friday 20 September 2019.

For queries relating to the Reference Group or assistance completing this Expression of Interest, please contact Gary Allen at The Hopkins Centre via g.allen@griffith.edu.au or by phone on c/o 07 3735 2069.

Download expression of interest form >

Conflicts of interest declarationGary Allen is a Griffith University staff member, he is the lead investigator for this research project and he is a member of The Hopkins Centre’s Ambassadors Committee.  Gary is also a member of the national committee reviewing s4 of the National Statement (2007 updated 2018).

Fudged research results erode people’s trust in experts – The Conversation (Gavin Moodie | July 2019)0

Posted by Admin in on August 11, 2019
 

Reports of research misconduct have been prominent recently and probably reflect wider problems of relying on dated integrity protections.

The recent reports are from Retraction Watch, which is a blog that reports on the withdrawal of articles by academic journals. The site’s database reports that journals have withdrawn a total of 247 papers with an Australian author going back to the 1980s.

This compares with 324 papers withdrawn with Canadian authors, 582 from the UK and 24 from New Zealand. Australian retractions are 1.2% of all retractions reported on the site, a fraction of Australia’s 4% share of all research publications.

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