ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

REAlising a collegiate Research Ethics Adviser network0

 

By
Dr Gary Allen| Senior Consultant AHRECS| gary.allen@ahrecs.com
Dr Mark Israel| Senior Consultant AHRECS| mark.israel@ahrecs.com

Our research ethics consultancy activity in recent years has involved us working with a broad range of research institutions. Despite diversity in size, budget, age, geographical reach and mission, in some respects institutions face similar challenges, frustrations and risks. In relation to research ethics, the recurrent themes that we have noticed include:

  1. There being insufficient time and capacity to conduct professional development activities, especially activities focussed on the needs and experiences of schools, departments, research centres and research offices.
  2. A legacy of an adversarial climate, and distrust, between researchers, research ethics reviewers and the research office (Israel et al., 2016).
  3. Serious budgetary constraints.
  4. Difficulty in recruiting new members of the research ethics committee, especially from areas that do not have a long-standing connection to human research ethics or have had difficult experiences with research ethics review. This may be compounded by university initiatives to reshape their workforce in a way that prioritises research income and outputs.
  5. Review feedback needing to be detailed and long, but often receiving poor and aggressive responses.
  6. Difficulty in eliciting constructive, or sometimes any, response to internal or external consultations from some parts of the institution.

We have developed a strategy (Allen and Israel, 2018) that can form part of the response to these matters as part of a commitment to resourcing reflective practice. It draws on existing resources, fosters a better relationship between reviewers and researchers, helps target constructive feedback, builds the capacity of researchers to engage in ethical research, and prepares a new cohort of researchers to join the human research ethics committee.

SHORT BRIEFING PAPER ON REA NETWORKS

https://www.patreon.com/posts/24928731

Available to USD3/month patrons

A network of collegiate Research Ethics Advisers (REAs) enables a group of experienced researchers to act as a source of collegiate advice to other researchers in their area. Among the roles of a REA should be:
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  1. Involvement in facilitating professional development workshops and other activities in their area. This might initially involve them introducing sessions run by the university on particular aspects of research ethics pertinent to specific disciplines, commenting on the issues raised and engaging in discussion. Eventually, the entire activity might be facilitated by the REA. This strategy distributes leadership of human research ethics, and reinforces its important to quality research in their area, not ‘just’ a matter of complying with externally imposed rules.
  2. When applicants are sent complicated feedback, they might usefully be directed to consult their local REA before responding. This allows the review body to leave long written explanations to be complemented and explained by a more personal verbal explanation, and it should improve confidence that the applicant’s response will resolve the matter, rather than requiring another round of feedback.
  3. The REA network can serve as a conduit for information between researchers and reviewers, providing early warning to an institution when clashes might arise over methodology or changes in regulation.

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Having assisted a number of institutions to establish, appoint, provide professional development and support to REA networks, we have found the optimal appointment level to be at the school/team/department level with the number of REAs recruited from an area reflecting the number of researchers in that area who conduct human research.
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In our Patreon area, we have included:
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A briefing note about a standard operating procedure for a REA network with the heading Basic Structure, which provides a plan for the establishment and operation of a collegiate network.

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A subscription of USD 5/month will provide access to this material. A subscription of USD 15/month will provide access to all our Patreon materials. Contact us at Patreon@ahrecs.com to discuss.
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AHRECS would of course be delighted to help you turn those shells into documents tailored to your institution’s needs. We are also able to assist in the establishment and professional development of a collegiate REA network. Contact us at REA@ahrecs.comto discuss.

Figure 1 – A version of this image, which is not watermarked, is available from https://www.patreon.com/ahrecs with a USD3/month subscription.

References:

Allen, G and Israel, M (2018) Moving beyond Regulatory Compliance: Building Institutional Support for Ethical Reflection in Research. In Iphofen, R and Tolich, M (eds) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research Ethics. London: Sage. pp.276-288.

Israel, M, Allen, G and Thomson, C (2016) Australian Research Ethics Governance: Plotting the Demise of the Adversarial Culture. In van den Hoonaard, W and Hamilton, A (eds) The Ethics Rupture: Exploring Alternatives to Formal Research-Ethics Review. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp 285-316. http://www.utppublishing.com/The-Ethics-Rupture-Exploring-Alternatives-to-Formal-Research-Ethics-Review.html
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This post may be cited as:
Allen, G. &.Israel, M. (25 February 2019) REAlising a collegiate Research Ethics Adviser network. Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/realising-a-collegiate-research-ethics-adviser-network

Ten ways of ensuring affordable professional development in your institution0

 

Research institutions have a responsibility under the Australian Code to ‘Provide ongoing training and education that promotes and supports responsible research conduct for all researchers and those in other relevant roles’ (Responsibility 4). Among other things, the National Statement requires that each member of an HREC (National Statement 5.2.3c) receives professional development.

Some institutions may feel that this places a significant burden on the staff responsible for and the funds available for human research ethics and integrity. It won’t surprise you to hear that AHRECS thinks it can help.

1. We have created an expanding suite of professional development resources for subscribers in Patreon. Many of our clients are happy for us to share materials that have been developed for their specific needs once they have had first use, knowing that they will also benefit from the generosity of our other clients as part of a community of practice. A subscription of USD15 per month (approx. AUD20) enables access to all materials; these can then be shared across your institution. You can see two examples of the resources here. See https://www.patreon.com/ahrecs  for more information and to subscribe.

2. AHRECS runs free webinars of panel-based discussions on pressing matters of general interest. Over the last year, speakers from the NHMRC, AHEC, AHRECS and various HRECs have spoken about how to respond to the new Australian Code and the changes to the National Statement.

3. AHRECS can provide face-to-face workshops of up to a day for HRECs, research ethics advisors, groups of researchers and professional staff. We’ve been doing this for CSIRO for over a decade. We also pre-record in-meeting professional development for HRECs across the country, supplementing these video resources with video-conferenced question and answer sessions. Our offerings in this regard start from $900 for the in-meeting activities to $2300 for a full day on-site workshop. Contents and format can be tailored to your institution’s specific needs.

4. AHRECS publishes the free Research Ethics Monthly. As readers know, REM includes topical items relating to human research ethics and research integrity. Your staff could also draw on their experience to contribute to REM as a way of engaging with and receiving feedback from the broader Australasian research ethics community.

5. Institutions could make greater use of their researchers who engage thoughtfully with research ethics matters. HRECs could invite them to speak about ethics at one of their meetings, and record this to create a library of video materials. AHRECS would be happy to host and share these materials across the sector.

6. AHRECS can provide either mentoring or on-call advice to human research ethics/research integrity officers, secretaries, chairs or senior research leaders via email, phone or video-link (this complements in-house expertise and provides affordable access to decades of human research ethics/research integrity experience)

7. We are happy to recommend purchasing the Griffith University Research Ethics Manual which, at $10,000 allows you to gain access to about two years-worth of resource development in human research ethics. AHRECS doesn’t receive any financial benefit from this#, but we can covert the GUREM to a resource that reflects the jurisdictional and institutional contexts within which your researchers operate. Over the last year, we’ve completed this work for ECU and have created video resources to help researchers make best use of the research ethics manual.

8. AHRECS can run a full Masters unit on social research ethics. We deliver this as an intensive each year in Perth in partnership with the University of Western Australia.

9. Institutions can designate a policy officer responsible for reviewing and disseminating relevant news, industry and professional websites, using Google alerts and research output monitoring to collect material of potential interest/value to the University’s research ethics reviewers, REAs and/or researchers. Some of this work is already done by AHRECS for anyone subscribing to its free news service. The vast majority of links are either directly relevant to Australia or are otherwise of interest to the Australian research ethics community. When items are added, an alert+link is posted to our social media pages (LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook).

10. Ten sounds so much better than nine, doesn’t it? If you have a crash-hot idea about professional development that you want to share with other people in the sector, please suggest a piece for Research Ethics Monthly.

# Dr Gary Allen is the principal author of the GUREM so does receive a component of the license fee.

Contributor
Mark Israel, AHRECS Senior Consultant
Mark’s profilemark.israel@ahrecs.com

Israel, M. (21 December 2018) Ten ways of ensuring affordable professional development in your institution (2018). Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/ahrecs-admin/ten-ways-of-ensuring-affordable-professional-development-in-your-institution

 

Get access to some great resources (two examples included in this post) and support events like the Constructive Voices panels0

 

Every month we add at least two items to the subscribers’ area. These include vignettes and other resources to use in your internally delivered professional development workshops. They are shared on a creative commons basis, so a nominated person can download selected material, load it onto a local server and use it within his or her own institution multiple times.(as long as they adhere to the CC license). Included here is a example pf a discussion item. We are currently working on a library of 26+ research integrity short audio snippets that could be incorporated into your internal research integrity workshops (example also attached). A library of these will be available from the subscribers’ area.

In addition to getting access to these great material, patrons are helping AHRECS cover the costs of events like the Australian Code= and National Statement Constructive Voices panel discussions webinars.

A Gold sponsorship (which costs US15/month) provides access to all materials. Subscriptions are paid via PayPal. We can provide a payment receipt after each monthly payment.

Too become a patron visit https://www.patreon.com/ahrecs.

Feel free to contact us on patron@ahrecs.com to discuss.

Are you attending the ‘Constructive voices’ panel discussions in November about the 2018 changes to the Australian Code and National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research?0

 

Just a reminder these online discussions are free, but you will need to RSVP. Details below. Recordings of the sessions will be available from our subscribers area (https://www.patreon.com/ahrecs).


Australian Code (2018) – 8 November 2018
https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/r41

New South WalesThursday, 8 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
Western Australia Thursday, 8 November at 11:30:00 am AWST UTC+8 hours
Australian Capital TerritoryThursday, 8 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
QueenslandThursday, 8 November at 1:30:00 pm AEST UTC+10 hours
South AustraliaThursday, 8 November at 2:00:00 pm ACDT UTC+10:30 hours
Northern TerritoryThursday, 8 November at 1:00:00 pm ACST UTC+9:30 hours
Victoria Thursday, 8 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
New Zealand Thursday, 8 November at 4:30:00 pm NZDT UTC+13 hours

Moderator: Prof. Mark Israel
Guests: Jillian Barr (NHMRC) and Kandy White (Expert Working Committee and Director, Research Ethics and Integrity, Macquarie University)
Voices: Prof. Colin Thomson AM
Rapporteur: Dr Gary Allen

To RSVP:
Yes.AC_081118@ahrecs.com



National Statement (Updated 2018) – 22 November 2018

https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/_files_nhmrc/file/publications/national-statement-2018.pdf

New South WalesThursday, 22 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
Western Australia Thursday, 22 November at 11:30:00 am AWST UTC+8 hours
Australian Capital TerritoryThursday, 22 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
QueenslandThursday, 22 November at 1:30:00 pm AEST UTC+10 hours
South AustraliaThursday, 22 November at 2:00:00 pm ACDT UTC+10:30 hours
Northern Territory Thursday, 22 November at 1:00:00 pm ACST UTC+9:30 hours
Victoria Thursday, 22 November at 2:30:00 pm AEDT UTC+11 hours
New Zealand Thursday, 22 November at 4:30:00 pm NZDT UTC+13 hours

Moderator: Prof. Colin Thomson AM
Guests: Jeremy Kenner (NHMRC), Professor Wendy Rogers (Chair National Statement Review Working Group, Macquarie University) and Associate Professor Pamela Henry (Newly appointed Chair of the ECU, Human Research Ethics Committee)
Voices: Dr Gary Allen

To RSVP:
Yes.NS_221118@ahrecs.com



PROFILES:

Dr Gary Allen (AHRECS)

Gary is a member of the National Statement Review Working Group and chaired the committee that drafted the revision to NS Chapter 3.1. He is the Managing Director of, and a Senior Consultant with, AHRECS. Gary has worked in the human research ethics and research integrity spheres since 1997. He was formerly a member of the NHMRC’s Australian Health Ethics Committee. Gary holds a social science doctorate and a bachelor of education.
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Jillian Barr (NHMRC)

Jillian Barr is the Director of Ethics and Integrity NHMRC. Jillian’s work involves developing a range of ethics guidelines and research standards including the recently released 2018 Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research, the National Statement on Ethical conduct in Human Research and animal ethics guidelines. Jillian’s team is responsible for providing policy and guidance for Human Research Ethics Committees in Australia and for supporting the Australian Health Ethics Committee. Jillian is also responsible for research integrity matters that relate to research involving NHMRC funding.
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Associate Professor Pamela Henry

Associate Professor Pamela Henry is the Director of the Sellenger Centre for Research in Law, Justice and Social Change at ECU. She is also a newly appointed Chair of the ECU, Human Research Ethics Committee. Her role as the Director of the Sellenger Centre has seen her develop an extensive body of research in policing focused on integrity, use of information management systems, human source recruitment and management, use of force, policing those experiencing mental illness, and other programs of research examining the effectiveness of police operational deployment models. She also holds a PhD in Psychology.
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Professor Mark Israel (AHRECS)

Mark provides advice to higher education institutions, research agencies, government and non-government organisations in Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Taiwan, the United Kingdom and acts as an ethics reviewer and rapporteur for the European Research Council

As an Executive Director of and Senior Consultant with Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services, he works on institutional policy and practice in relation to research ethics and research integrity. Mark was a member of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council’s Working Party responsible for revision of Section 3 of the National Statement. He was professor of law and criminology at Flinders University and University of Western Australia

He has a degree in law and postgraduate qualifications in sociology, criminology and education from Oxford (DPhil), Cambridge (MA, MPhil) and Flinders Universities (MEdStudies) respectively. He has over 90 publications in the areas of criminology and socio-legal studies, higher education policy and practice, and research ethics and integrity. His recent books include Research Ethics and Integrity for Social Scientists: Beyond Regulatory Compliance (Sage, 2015).
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Jeremy Kenner (NHMRC)

Jeremy is Expert Advisor for Ethics at NHMRC. At NHMRC, he contributes to the development of guidelines and advice on matters related to health and research ethics, research integrity and governance and clinical trials. Jeremy’s experience includes ethics administration at Peter Maccallum Cancer Centre, multiple roles in education and law practice. His various loyalties extend to Melbourne, Tasmania, Canada and the U.S
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Professor Wendy Rogers (Professor of Clinical Ethics, Macquarie University)

Wendy Rogers is Professor of Clinical Ethics at Macquarie University and Deputy Director of the Macquarie University Research Centre on Agency, Values and Ethics, with strong interests in healthcare policy and practice. During her first term on the Australian Health Ethics Committee she served on the working party responsible for the 2007 revision of the National Statement. Since 2010, she has been Chair of the working party on the current rolling revision of the National Statement. Her research interests include over diagnosis, ethics of surgical practice and research, transplant abuse and vulnerability.
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Professor Colin Thomson AM (AHRECS)

Colin Thomson AM is a senior consultant with Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty. Ltd. (AHRECS) and a former Professor in Health Law and Ethics in Graduate Medicine, University of Wollongong and positions in law faculties at the Australian National University and the University of Wollongong.

He was a member of the Medical Research Ethics Committee of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), a member and chair of the Australian Health Ethics Committee and Consultant in Health Ethics to the NHMRC.

As a consultant, he conducted training for human research ethics committees (HRECs) in State Health departments in Queensland, NSW, Victoria and Tasmania and in universities in all States and territories; certification assessments for the NHMRC National Certification Scheme and advised government departments in the Commonwealth, NSW and Victoria.

He has been a member and chair of multiple HRECs in universities, local health districts, government departments and public sector agencies.

In 2018, he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for services to medical research and research ethics.
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Dr Karolyn (Kandy) White

Kandy is the Director, Research Ethics and Integrity at Macquarie University. Kandy has taught research ethics to undergraduate and postgraduate student both in Australia and overseas as well as to ethics committee members. She Chairs a Social Science and Humanities Human Research Ethics Committee. Kandy has been the Chair of the AEN Advisory Group, co-convenor of ARMS Research Ethics and Integrity SIG, a member of the national Code Review Committee established to revise the Australian Code and Chair of the Better Practice Guides (BPG) working group responsible for developing the Investigation Guide.
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