ACN - 101321555 Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)
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Australasian Human Research Ethics Consultancy Services Pty Ltd (AHRECS)

Working flexibly through the Coronavirus: Continuing professional development in research integrity or human research ethics?0

 

Research ethics and research integrity professional development works best as a long-term commitment to building the capacity of the current and next generation of researchers. As universities extend their online capacity to educate coursework students in the face of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) and place restrictions on staff travel, there is little reason to close down all professional development for staff and research students.

We think there are a number of compelling reasons to conduct these workshops online.  Online workshops offer an opportunity to trigger research conversations among staff working remotely; their timing can be readily adjusted to meet availabilities and they can also be captured and reused in the institution over the next couple of years.

Using Zoom,[1] AHRECS can deliver online workshops for any number of HDR candidates, supervisors and early career researchers. The workshops would be tailored to your institution and your needs. We have run such workshops across Australia, New Zealand and the broader region.

The basic type of workshop lasts for 55 minutes and works best for up to 20 participants. This workshop costs $2000. https://www.ahrecs.vip subscribers receive a 10% discount. Such a workshop might be a 101 introduction or more advanced and practical. AHRECS can also run longer, more interactive workshops and run sessions for larger groups, on request.

Send an email to emquiry@ahrecs.com to discuss further.

[1] Zoom has the advantage of being free for the user and being accessible via computer, tablet and smartphone.  It also supports connection via phone. Sessions can be recorded.

Research ethics review during a time of pandemic0

 

Gary Allen, Mark Israel and Colin Thomson

COVID-19 is prompting changes to academic delivery, essentially intended to contain the spread of the virus and protect the most vulnerable from its effects. As more countries introduce travel restrictions and mandate self-isolation, it will no doubt change the way we conduct research.

Research ethics review needs to adapt to meet the needs of these trying times.

We have written previously about the use of proportional review and proportional processes to progress matters outside of a research ethics committee meeting.

But there will always be matters that need to be considered by a human research ethics committee.

One of the strengths of committee review and one of the reasons flying minutes are not favoured is that a committee’s membership brings together different perspectives, lived experience and knowledge.

It remains important that committees exercise their responsibilities in paragraph 5.2.31 of the National Statement.

5.2.31 Decisions by an HREC about whether a research proposal meets the requirements of this National Statement must be informed by an exchange of opinions from each of those who constitute the minimum membership (see paragraph 5.1.30). This exchange should, ideally, take place at a meeting with all those members present.

But, that does not mean committee members need to sit together in a room.  The same valuable results might be achieved with video conferencing packages like Zoom and MS Teams, Blackboard Collaborate, perhaps even aided by asynchronous online collaborations on feedback. AHRECS has worked with many institutions that already run their meetings successfully online.

Of course, institutions may need to assess their on-line or virtual meeting systems to ensure they enable chairs to be satisfied that there has been an exchange of opinion and not merely individual expressions that are unseen by other members.

In addition, AHRECS can help you take advantage of an online meeting by conducting a short professional development activity on a topic of your choice.  This would involve a further reading and reflection booklet, 15-minute pre-recorded presentation (e.g. Social Media and human research ethics) and 15 minutes of Q&A/discussion.  The cost of such an activity is A$900.

Email enquiry@ahrecs.com to discuss further.

 

Question for Research Ethics Monthly readers: Win for your institution a new 12-month subscription to https://www.ahrecs.vip0

Posted by Admin in AHRECS Admin, Human Research Ethics, Research Integrity, Services on December 23, 2019 / Keywords: , ,
 

Prof. Mark Israel and Dr Gary Allen

We would like to encourage institutions to try out the ahrecs.vip set of resources. We also would like to crowdsource additional material and request the help of members of the research ethics community of practice. People like you. So, if you would like an opportunity to win a new 12-month subscription to ahrecs.vip, please send us your answer to one of the following questions:

  1. The best thing our HREC ever did was…
  2. The most important change I’d make to how my institution deals with research ethics is…

Your response to either of these questions should be between 50 and 500 words and can take the form of a short briefing note, a poem or a video recording with emphasis on either entertainment or information or both. Your submission must be received by 5pm Friday 31 March 2020.

Entries will be judged by members of the AHRECS team.  The best entry will win for their institution a new 12-month subscription to https://www.ahrecs.vip (valued at $350).  The April edition of the Research Ethics Monthly will include excerpts from some of our favourite entries and AHRECS reserves the right to draw on material within the entries and reproduce within the ahrecs.vip site while acknowledging the source of the material.

For more information send an email to gary.allen@ahrecs.com.

Smarter proportional research ethics review0

 

Rushing toward a faster review decision should not mean relaxing standards or playing chicken with stricter central control

Gary Allen, Mark Israel and Colin Thomson

Too often, there is a danger that ‘expedited ethical review’ (a term not used in the National Statement since 1999) might equate to an approach that abridges the review process to the point where it’s little more than a friendly exchange between peers or a nod to seniority. We won’t call out the well-reported cases where it is hard to fathom how they were granted ethics approval. Such cases should make us uncomfortable, because they are invitations to replace institutional self-regulation with something hasher and unsympathetic.

Don’t get us wrong, we’ve spoken often and enthusiastically about the value of well-designed proportional review arrangements. We have assisted many clients, large and small, to design and implement such arrangements and believe that they form part of a well-conceived review system.

A proportional review arrangement can deliver a review outcome much faster than consideration by a human research ethics committee, but instead of a ‘Claytons’ or mock-review, it should have the following features:

  1. While there can, and should, be a mechanism to do an automated quick self-assessment of whether a proposed project qualifies for ethics review other than by a research ethics committee, the process should:
    1. not rely on questions along the lines of “Is this a low risk research project?”
    2. draw on, reference and link to guidance material.
    3. when using trigger questions, ensure they are nuanced, with probing sub-questions.
    4. include confirmation of a quick assessment by an experienced ethics officer or chairperson.
    5. retain an applicant’s responses, both as a record of what they said about the project, and for future evaluation of whether the arrangement is correctly assessing new projects and guiding applications along the correct review pathway.
  2. The process should preferably be online, easily (re)configurable, easily auditable, with information entered by applicants and ‘triaged’ by an ethics officer.
  3. A quality online system will populate committee papers and reports, will issue reminders and will populate with known information.
  4. While many projects may be reviewed outside of the human research ethics committee, the reviews should be conducted by experienced persons, who participate in annual professional development and who can draw upon internal and external policy and resource material.

In Australia, an institution’s proportional review arrangements might include the following pathways:

  1. Prior review– Research that has already been reviewed by another HREC, appropriately delegated review body, or an international body equivalent to an Australian research ethics review body.
  2. Scope checker– A test to confirm whether a proposed project is in fact human research.
  3. Exemption test– A test to determine whether the proposed research is a type an institution could exempt from ethics review as per the National Statement.
  4. HREC review required test– A test to confirm whether the research project is of a type the National Statement specifies must be reviewed by a HREC.
  5. Institutional exemption test– Many institutionsexempt some categories of human research from research ethics review (e.g. universities often exempt course evaluations and practical activities for a teaching-learning purpose).
  6. Negligible risk research– Subject to qualifying criteria an institution might establish a negligible risk review pathway in which applications are considered administratively.
  7. Low-risk, and minimal ethical issue research– Subject to qualifying criteria, proposed projects that are low risk and have minimal ethical sensitivity could be reviewed by the chair of the research ethics committee.
  8. Low-risk, some ethical issue research– Again subject to qualifying criteria, proposed projects that are low risk but have some ethical sensitivity could be reviewed by a small panel of the research ethics committee (including external member of the committee).
  9. HREC review – Only human research (see 2), that has not previously been reviewed (see 1) that is not exempt (see 3 and 4) and has not been classified as negligible risk (see 6) or low risk (see 7 and 8) needs to be reviewed by HREC.

An arrangement with the features listed above would allow for review that is proportional, timely, efficient and justifiable. Reviews that are merely expedited or fast places us all at risk. The increasing examples of “how could that have been approved?” makes it feel as though some institutions are gambling that a desire to meet researchers’ calls for quick, if superficial, review won’t be exposed by unethical practice. Perhaps they are correct, but every new reported review misstep makes us more nervous. Realistically, establishing a nationally administered reliable, robust and agile proportional review process requires substantial investment of time and other resources so is unlikely to happen.  But, what poor review processes could do is invite far more detailed direction on how institutions can design, conduct and monitor processes outside of a HREC. In our experience, there are greater and longer-lasting benefits that can accrue from an institution having a high quality approach to proportional review.

The above is a summary of the discussion we typically include in blueprint documents about establishing a robust proportional review arrangement. We have included some further notes on this topic on our https://www.ahrecs.vip and Patreon pages.

Please contact us at proportional@ahrecs.com if you would like to discuss how we might assist your institution.

This post may be cited as:
Allen, G., Israel, M. & Thomson, C. (26 August 2019) Smarter proportional research ethics review.  Research Ethics Monthly. Retrieved from: https://ahrecs.com/human-research-ethics/smarter-proportional-research-ethics-review

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